EDSAC teleprinter handover

Hyperscale IT donate 56-year-old EDSAC II computing equipment

EDSAC I replica as it stands todayHyperscale IT, who supply integrated server hardware, also pride ourselves on finding hard-to-source legacy parts. Now, when we say legacy parts, we’re largely referring to server hardware that has gone EOL and needs a memory upgrade, or has blown a power supply etc. But we recently reunited a 56-year-old teleprinter and tape reader with other EDSAC II parts at the National Museum of Computing in Bletchley Park, UK.

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JPSeco natural fibre reinforced plastics (NFRP) with low CO2 emissions.

OCP now with optional greener low CO2 plastic

Open compute meets low CO2 plastics

At the Open Compute Project (OCP) Summit last month we spoke to Simon Huang, general manager from JPSeco (Jean Parker & Sons Corp). JPSeco have been working on a Natural Fiber Reinforced Plastic (NFRP) which has very low CO2 emissions compared to traditional plastics that are used in servers today. Continue reading

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Rise of the white box

The rise of the white box server

White box from the beginning

First, let us define a white box server. A white box server (sometimes referred to as a beige box) is a machine without a well-known brand name associated with it. White boxes are usually made en masse by Asian original design manufacturers (ODMs) such as Quanta, Wistron, Inventec and Wiwynn. They are also produced by system integrators who build systems assembled from parts purchased separately to create bespoke systems.

OK, so where do black boxes come from? In the traditional IT procurement model, enterprise customers buy from original equipment manufactures (OEMs) such as HPE, Dell and IBM. The OEMs in turn outsource the manufacturing of hardware to the ODMs. It is at this point you are buying a branded, closed, black box server.

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Jason Taylor gives the keynote presentation at the OCP U.S. Summit 2016

OCP Summit US 2016 summary

OCP Summit news

2016 marked the seventh OCP Summit and was held in San Jose, California. It attracted over 2000 people this year including many industry leaders. Jason Taylor, President and Chairman of the Open Compute Project (OCP), and VP of Infrastructure for Facebook, highlighted the continued growth of the OCP community. He also discussed the OCP momentum seen among large web, financial technology, and telecommunications companies, during his keynote presentation. Continue reading

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Azure Stack - From Appliance to Pack to Stack

Azure Stack – From Appliance to Pack to Stack

Third time’s a charm. Microsoft, back in May 2014 at the Ignite Conference, announced Azure Stack (or Azure, but from the safety of your own home datacentre). Stack will be the third evolution of their Azure for on-premises offering and will now overshadow the existing Azure Pack (which is more like a wrapper around System Center) and non existing Azure Appliance. This having been said, Microsoft will be running the Stack and Pack side by side, so you are not forced to jump ship to the next shiniest thing. Continue reading

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Do OpenStack users say yes or no?

OpenStack bi-annual report just in. Users up, NPS down.

The SUSE Linux vendor runs a six-monthly survey on OpenStack users’ attitudes and deployments. The results of this bi-annual report, completed by some 1315 individuals across the planet, are just in.

Headlines include that 60% of deployments are now in production, compared to 32% under two years ago, and twice as many users filled in the survey this time. Over half the community works in cloud operating, which I guess is no surprise. What was more surprising to me was that the size of organisations using OpenStack (in terms of headcount) is fairly evenly distributed. For example, the number of OpenStack-using companies with 1 to 9 employees was similar to those with 100,000 or more. Although, as a trend, the uptake in larger companies is increasing survey to survey, maybe they are having a slower incubation time to get OpenStack into production. Continue reading

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