Dell starts DSS a new business unit

Sub-hyperscale is a thing, thanks to Dell

2015 saw Dell strengthen its commitment to hyperscale customers, well ‘almost’ hyperscale customers. Before we go into that, first a tiny bit of history. Eight years ago Dell created Data Centre Solutions (DCS). DCS set about designing and building solutions tailor-made for scale-out datacentre environments: hyperscale. This has set them up as a major player in this arena and today DCS supports some major hyperscale customers like Amazon, Google and Facebook.

Dell love you, even if you are not the biggest hyperscaler

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MaaS logo

Canonical MaaS installation

Recently we had the need to install a number of Ubuntu boxes for a client. Whilst our usual home-grown scripts with Kickstart and Salt work just fine, they are not the most intuitive to hand over or maintain. So we used Canonical’s MaaS or Metal as a Service. We are talking tens of machines, not thousands, so we created a single node MaaS installation. This gives flexibility for future deployments, as MaaS can install a number of different operating systems.

This is a walk through of what turned out to be a very quick and easy install. Now we can install servers on mass maas. Continue reading

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XMAS corrected to say X MAAS

Merry ChristMaaS

Today we are looking at MaaS from Canonical, the makers of Ubuntu. MaaS, which stands for Metal as a Service, promises to automatically and dynamically provision your servers. It’s the same idea as cloud provisioning, but now with your own bare metal servers. Very exciting indeed, so we thought we would give it a try. Continue reading

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Push once for hyperscale monitoring

Monitoring hyperscale environments

Chances are, if you have thousands of servers, you are running some sort of hyperscale environment. But is your monitoring hyperscale-friendly?

In the beginning you might well have had 10 servers all running business-critical applications. You dutifully monitored everything on the server. Well, you dutifully monitored after you have had too many issues with no monitoring at all.

Then, over time, each new outage brought you a new set of checks and before you knew it, your boxes became extremely monitored. They have a multitude of ways to set the pager off. Your monitoring strategy continues like this as your server farm grows. Before you know it, you have hundreds, maybe even thousands, of machines with very basic false positive monitoring. Continue reading

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